How to Survive When Your Translator Goes on Vacation

Nataly Kelly

VP of Marketing

Nataly brings nearly two decades of translation industry experience to Smartling, most recently as Chief Research Officer at industry research firm Common Sense Advisory. Previously, she held positions at AT&T Language Line and NetworkOmni (acquired by Language Line), where she oversaw product development. A veteran translator and certified court interpreter for Spanish, she has formally studied seven languages, and is currently learning Irish.

A former Fulbright scholar in sociolinguistics, Nataly lives in the Boston area with her husband. When she isn’t working, you’ll usually find her translating Ecuadorian poetry, writing books, and exploring the world (36 countries and counting!).

@natalykelly

Visit Nataly's LinkedIn page

I’ll never forget it. I was at one of the largest high-tech companies in the world, talking to their head of localization, who had designed a sophisticated way to measure translation quality. He showed me their graph of quality scores over time, and asked me if I had any idea why their quality scores went down during the months of July and August.

My answer: “The translators that normally work on your projects took vacation.”

Continue reading

When Is It Time to Translate Your App?

Tim Oldenhuis

I’m a native Dutch translator living in the Netherlands. I translate for Coursera to help make education accessible for everyone. My interests are SEO, Gamification and Marketing. I translate websites and blogs, primarily from English and German into Dutch.

Big game developers almost always deliver their apps in several languages. As an independent app developer, especially if you’re new to the trade, delivering a translated app isn’t always easy. It’s a challenge to figure out when to translate an app, or if it should even be translated at all. The reason for this is that, unless you know someone who speaks the language, it will likely be very expensive to translate, although it would be worth the expense.

Continue reading

How Cultural Immersion Affects Translation

Peter Billings

I manage a specialized translation boutique with a small dedicated team of world-class linguistic professionals. My focus is on helping clients in Japan get their message across worldwide with precision and punch. Going the other way, I help global organizations penetrate the often quirky and mysterious Japanese market.

Clients always ask for “native” translators. But even among the natives, a strange mental fog can set in among translators with many years of experience in a given source language. Too much exposure to the language and culture of the original document can be a problem, in fact. After 20 years of experience in the industry evaluating and trying to improve translations, I’ve seen it happen to the best of them, including me.

Continue reading

Where Transcreation Ends and Localization Begins

Nataly Kelly

VP of Marketing

Nataly brings nearly two decades of translation industry experience to Smartling, most recently as Chief Research Officer at industry research firm Common Sense Advisory. Previously, she held positions at AT&T Language Line and NetworkOmni (acquired by Language Line), where she oversaw product development. A veteran translator and certified court interpreter for Spanish, she has formally studied seven languages, and is currently learning Irish.

A former Fulbright scholar in sociolinguistics, Nataly lives in the Boston area with her husband. When she isn’t working, you’ll usually find her translating Ecuadorian poetry, writing books, and exploring the world (36 countries and counting!).

@natalykelly

Visit Nataly's LinkedIn page

It’s tough enough to distinguish translation from transcreation. But what about separating transcreation from localization? That’s a more difficult distinction, because there are certainly areas of overlap.

Continue reading

Content Types and Expectations for Translation Memory Reuse

Alison Toon

Alison Toon, Smartling’s Senior Director, New Markets, has been working in the translation industry for two decades. With a background in enterprise-scale translation management, she was previously responsible for building and managing Hewlett-Packard's globalization program and translation technologies across all business units.

She is also an avid photographer, music blogger (check out “Toon’s Tunes”!), and frequent presenter at translation and content management conferences and webinars, including Localization World, GALA, Gilbane, and ATA.

@alisontoon

One of the biggest benefits of centralizing the management of translation, is the reuse that is gained through translation memory. If you’ve never used translation memory before, it means that you no longer waste money translating the same sentences over, and over, again. If you have used translation memory, but in a decentralized way–maybe with separate translation memories in the hands of multiple language service providers–it means that you will increase the amount of translation that can be leveraged, across content types and regardless of the translators and language service providers who are providing your translations.

Continue reading

Translation and Journalism: When Is Software Useful?

Carlos Garcia-Arista

I am a native Spanish translator based in Barcelona, Spain. I have degrees in journalism and Spanish philology. I also work as a freelance writer.

In articles about machine translation or auto-writing algorithms, the question is always the same: is a machine capable of doing a human’s job? I believe the correct approach would be to consider how machines and humans could take the communication process as a whole one step further, together. I can think of at least four very specific circumstances in which software helps us to do things that were impossible a short time ago.

Continue reading

Six Ways Transcreation Differs from Translation

Nataly Kelly

VP of Marketing

Nataly brings nearly two decades of translation industry experience to Smartling, most recently as Chief Research Officer at industry research firm Common Sense Advisory. Previously, she held positions at AT&T Language Line and NetworkOmni (acquired by Language Line), where she oversaw product development. A veteran translator and certified court interpreter for Spanish, she has formally studied seven languages, and is currently learning Irish.

A former Fulbright scholar in sociolinguistics, Nataly lives in the Boston area with her husband. When she isn’t working, you’ll usually find her translating Ecuadorian poetry, writing books, and exploring the world (36 countries and counting!).

@natalykelly

Visit Nataly's LinkedIn page

How do you know when you need transcreation instead of translation? Here are six ways to distinguish between the two:

Continue reading

QA Testing with CAT Tools

Tim Oldenhuis

I’m a native Dutch translator living in the Netherlands. I translate for Coursera to help make education accessible for everyone. My interests are SEO, Gamification and Marketing. I translate websites and blogs, primarily from English and German into Dutch.

There have been times where I’ve had to do QA testing with CAT tools. It is usually a positive experience, but there have been times when the CAT tool has made the QA efforts incredibly complicated to finish.

The first time I worked on QA testing I had a tough experience with a specific CAT tool. I lacked enough understanding of the CAT tool, which is the main reason the process became a challenge, but the complex implementation of being able to complete a QA test was also difficult.

Continue reading

The 6 World Languages That Aren’t English

Moe Bachouti

Moe is a member of the marketing team at Smartling. He is a translation industry veteran who managed strategic accounts for Lionbridge and worked for several years in the field of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Translation, and NLP at Raytheon BBN Technologies.

Moe is also an academic scholar with a focus on social identity in the public sphere. He has authored publications involving both technical and social sciences. Fluent in Arabic, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Moe also has a working knowledge of Italian, French, German, and Catalan.

elbachouti

Visit Moe's LinkedIn page

English is one of the world’s most common languages. The British Council reports that English has special or official status in greater than 75 countries and is spoken as a first or second language by more than 700 million people in the world today. However, companies that are looking to invest in website translation to globalize their offerings might be wondering which languages to choose if they want to maximize the efficiency of their translations. If you are looking to use best practices for translating a website, it is important that you are translating your page into languages that will help you reach the largest number of people.

Continue reading

Translating Marketing Campaigns into Spanish

Tim Oldenhuis

I’m a native Dutch translator living in the Netherlands. I translate for Coursera to help make education accessible for everyone. My interests are SEO, Gamification and Marketing. I translate websites and blogs, primarily from English and German into Dutch.

A lot of companies have been trying to translate their marketing campaigns into Spanish, but only a few of these companies have done it successfully. The reason for this is because there are cultural differences that every translator should know about when translating into Spanish.

Continue reading